Android Phone: Buying Guide


android phone

We’ve all been there. You can almost see the new phone in your hand. You know it’s going to change your life! Then reality rears its ugly head and you remember that buying a new phone is a minefield of options, prices and contracts. It should therefore come as no surprise that smartphones are the most commonly stolen item, because if you don’t know what you’re doing, choosing one can be headache-inducing.

What Makes An Android?

A close up of a cake

There are four main things that make an Android phone, or any phone for that matter. The first is the operating system, which in this case is Google’s free-to-use version of Linux called “Android.” Without the OS there would be no phones. The second is the physical hardware, which includes every part that isn’t software. This ranges from components like WIFI capability to the battery and even the SIM card slot (with some strange phones). Thirdly it’s worth considering additional software pre-loaded onto your phone. These could include anything from a custom home screen launcher to various widgets. Lastly, you have what is known as “configurations;” essentially how your wireless carrier has decided to brand and market your device combined with how much they have subsidized the phone when sold to you.

What Do You Need In A Phone?

A group of palm trees

In this section, we’re going to list a couple of features that may be worth considering when buying your next Android phone. In no particular order these are:

Processor speed :

The processor is the part of the phone that does most of the work and it’s important not to get one that is underpowered for your needs. If you need a faster, more powerful phone then think about shelling out some extra cash on something like a Samsung Galaxy S II or LG Optimus 2X (which both use dual-core processors). These devices will still be around in two years if you only plan on keeping your new phone for twelve months. If your budget is tight, try to get something that uses the older NVIDIA Tegra 2 chipset (such as the HTC Desire S).

Internal storage

Internal storage is vital but phones are starting to offer ways of expanding the amount of storage you have. If your phone has an SD card slot it’s important to consider how much internal memory comes with the device, especially if it only has 4GB or 8GB. If you want to store lots of media on your phone then get one that supports at least 32GB, otherwise, get a large capacity SD card instead. GPS: Having a phone with a built-in GPS receiver is important to many users and it’s great for navigation while driving or walking through an unfamiliar city. However, some manufacturers put cheap GPS receivers in their devices which can make getting a signal difficult. If you plan on using your device as a sat nav then look for one that uses SiRF Star III chipset or anything from Broadcom (since these are the best).

0thers features

Although having wireless radios always switched on might seem like a great idea, using them constantly sucks power from the battery much faster than when it’s in standby. Battery technology has been around for years, so try to get a phone with decent battery life. If you plan on having all your wireless radios switched on constantly or playing games frequently then opt for something like an extended battery or spare battery pack for added longevity. Storage space: Internal storage is vital but phones are starting to offer ways of expanding the amount of storage you have. If your phone has an SD card slot it’s important to consider how much internal memory comes with the device, especially if it only has 4GB or 8GB. If you want to store lots of media on your phone then get one that supports at least 32GB, otherwise get a large capacity SD card instead.

Having a phone with a built-in GPS receiver is important to many users and it’s great for navigation while driving or walking through an unfamiliar city. However, some manufacturers put cheap GPS receivers in their devices which can make getting a signal difficult. If you plan on using your device as a sat nav then look for one that uses SiRF Star III chipset or anything from Broadcom (since these are the best). Communication: This is a given because no phone would be complete if it didn’t have at least a GSM radio and some form of data connectivity. The most important features in this area include WiFi 802.11 b/g/n, Bluetooth 3.0+HS, NFC and good call quality. In terms of cellular radios it’s important to use phones with either Qualcomm MSM7227 chipset which supports HSPA+, quad-band GSM for worldwide compatibility, dual-band UMTS/HSPA+ which works well in different regions of the world and fallback support for quad-band GSM and single- or dual-band UMTS/HSPA which means limited speeds (usually 3.6Mbps for UMTS)

By checking all the above-mentioned features you are able to buy the best android phone.

Subscribe to our monthly Newsletter
Subscribe to our monthly Newsletter